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When is an Annexe Not an Annexe?

By: Helena Stratford - Updated: 20 Nov 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Annexe Extension Planning Entrance

Planning issues with any extension build project have the potential to be complicated but when considering an annexe, there are several points to take into account.

Whether a property already has an existing, interconnecting 'granny' annexe, a completely separate unit or whether the plan is to separate part of the home to potentially let it, the configuration can all make a big difference to how a Local Planning Authority is likely to view the situation - as well as what the owner wishes to do with it.

Definition of an Annexe

An annexe is defined in planning guidance notes as:
Accommodation which is ancillary to the main residential dwelling and used for this purpose. It may be interconnecting within the property as a whole (for instance via doorways) or it may be accessed via a completely separate external entrance, but if it forms separate and additional accommodation for the main house, it will be viewed as an annexe.

Council Tax and Annexes

Contrary to popular belief, a home does not have to have a separate entrance or front door to be liable for a separate council tax charge. The Valuations Office, a branch of HMRC and the department responsible for setting Council Tax on properties, deems an annexe to be liable for separate banding if it could be classed as a self-contained unit - i.e. it has its own kitchen area, bathroom and sleeping/living space - even if it shares other services and entrances with the main house. Two sets of Council Tax could be levied if a property has an annex, so you'll need to consider that if you are:

  1. building an annexe
  2. buying a house with an annexe
  3. designing an extension to include an annexe

You may be able to apply for a 'Class T' exemption to the second amount of tax if it is possible to prove that the annexe is :

  • for sole family use
  • for someone who is substantially mentally or physically disabled
  • for a relative over the age of 65

Flexibility of an Annexe

Annexes seem to have grown in popularity over recent years as they are a relatively simple way of utilising a home or extension in the most flexible way. For some, they can provide a useful extra income through renting out the additional space whilst for others, an annexe can provide future security as families plan for ageing relatives and 'boomerang' children who return to live at home after university.

Letting an Annexe

What is crucial, however, is to be clear as to how the annexe may be used right at the planning stage. If the annexe is to be commercially let at any time, then Change of Use Planning will be required and it varies hugely from LPA to LPA (Local Planning Authority) as to how such projects are viewed. Back in 2012, there was talk of permission being scrapped for annexes but so far nothing has happened and it is vital to check with the council before commencing any work. Detail of exactly what is permitted can be found on page 40 of the government guidance notes: Permitted Development for Householders - Technical Guidance.

Wider Implications of Letting an Annexe

It follows that if the annexe is to be let, then there will be further implications and responsibilities to consider. The mortgage lender will need to be informed and again, depending on the provider,attitudes will vary as to whether they look favourably on this or not. Insurance will also need to be checked as some home insurance companies, such as Direct Line, don't take on residential landlord's insurance and of course there will be tax implications from the resulting revenue stream in renting the property.

Becoming a Landlord should not be taken lightly and it would be wise to consider legal obligations such as gas safety checks, fire regulations and access to the annexe at an early planning stage as it could mean expensive alterations to the house as a whole.

Letting Rooms within the Home

If the property already has an 'internal' annexe - i.e. it isn't completely separate from the main house but has its own bathroom, then one option available, in consideration of any extension build plans, is to let the rooms to a lodger. This is certainly possible - and financially very beneficial - under the Government's Rent-a-Room scheme. This scheme allows a person to earn up to £4200 per annum tax free by letting out a portion of their home. What is clear, however, is that:
  • The owner of the property must be living at the home
  • The property owner must have regular access to the lodger's area
  • The kitchen must be shared. If the annexe section has its own kitchen and is separable from the main part of the house then this, under council legislation, is deemed to need separate planning.

An annexe then, can be a flexible, useful and potentially profitable addition to a home - but it can also bring with it a minefield of red tape - mainly between the Valuations office and the Planning office - and could saddle the home owner with the unanticipated role and responsibilities of acting as Landlord. So before making any plans to buy, build or alter a property with an annexe, it is important to have that conversation with the Local Planning Authority first.

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[Add a Comment]
Kettle - Your Question:
Hi, some advice needed please. We recently bought and renovated a property. At the time it was classed as a house with an annex. As condition of our mortgage we were told to remove the covered area between the old house and the annex, which was actually a 2 bedroom bungalow linked by an outside corridor. The house was in a really bad state, we removed the corridor and the bungalow is now only linked to the house with exsisting low level out buildings. When we tried to get more money to finish the project the valuers told us that the annex was now no longer an annex but a separate house. We pay separate utilities and council tax and to cover this have been renting it out on airbnb. What is the best course of action. Do we split the deeds and have two separate properties only one of which has a morgage or leave it as it is? I am worried about our morgage company not being happy and where we stand with insurance, liability etc etc.

Our Response:
Even though the council will regard an annex as a separate property for councikl tax purposes, splitting the properties into two titles with separate address for Land Registry purposes requires planning permission. We can't really advise you of the best way to handle your finances unfortunately as we don't have any authority to do that. You might be wise to seek the opinion of a financial adviser
ExtensionBuild - 21-Nov-17 @ 12:06 PM
Hi, some advice needed please. We recently bought and renovated a property. At the time it was classed as a house with an annex. As condition of our mortgage we were told to remove the covered area between the old house and the annex, which was actually a 2 bedroom bungalow linked by an outside corridor. The house was in a really bad state, we removed the corridor and the bungalow is now only linked to the house with exsisting low level out buildings. When we tried to get more money to finish the project the valuers told us that the annex was now no longer an annex but a separate house. We pay separate utilities and council tax and to cover this have been renting it out on airbnb. What is the best course of action. Do we split the deeds and have two separate properties only one of which has a morgage or leave it as it is? I am worried about our morgage company not being happy and where we stand with insurance, liability etc etc...
Kettle - 20-Nov-17 @ 3:12 PM
Yamin - Your Question:
We have had a two story extension built. Downstairs we have a kitchen diner with a sitting area. This replaced a smaller single story kitchen diner. In the original part of the downstairs we used the original kitchen as a utility room. It had the original electric connection for an electric cooker. We are thinking of renting out the old part of our house as an air b and b flat. It would have shared front and back hallways but comprise a bedsitting room (sofa-bed) a kitchen and a bathroom. Would such an arrangement be liable for a separate band of council tax and could we get tax relief with the rent a room scheme.

Our Response:
If it is self-contained with its own living area as well as cooking and washing facilities and a toilet it is classed as a separate annexe for council tax purpose. It includes living accommodation physically separated from other accommodation and also living accommodation annexed to and sharing access with adjoining accommodation.
ExtensionBuild - 8-Nov-17 @ 2:52 PM
We have had a two story extension built. Downstairs we have a kitchen diner with a sitting area.This replaced a smaller single story kitchen diner. In the original part of the downstairs we used the original kitchen as a utility room. It had the original electric connection for an electric cooker. We are thinking of renting out the old part of our house as an air b and b flat. It would have shared front and back hallways but comprise a bedsitting room (sofa-bed) a kitchen and a bathroom. Would such an arrangement be liable for a separate band of council tax and could we get tax relief with the rent a room scheme.
Yamin - 7-Nov-17 @ 7:19 PM
utg1883 - Your Question:
I currently rent a room above a detached double garage at our property, I has been rented for last 15 years and the tennants have always been liable for council tax.If I decide I no longer wish to rent, will I still be liable for the council tax if it remains empty ? Alternatively I would like to make available for my children (Aged 12 & 13) to use a s "Snug" / Homework / Chill out room ? Will I be liable for council tax if it is for our own sole familly use ?

Our Response:
The Valuation Office may look at each case differently. In general if you've removed/changed a separate area of living accommodation you should contact the VOA. The VOA will only be able to remove a Council Tax band if the area or annexe has been sufficiently altered so that it could no longer be lived in separately.
ExtensionBuild - 1-Nov-17 @ 3:08 PM
I currently rent a room above a detached double garage at our property, i has been rented for last 15 years and the tennants have always been liable for council tax. If i decide i no longer wish to rent, will i still be liable for the council tax if it remains empty ? Alternatively i would like to make available for my children (Aged 12 & 13) to use a s "Snug" / Homework / Chill out room ? Will i be liable for council tax if it is for our own sole familly use ?
utg1883 - 31-Oct-17 @ 9:36 AM
Rob - Your Question:
Hi there. Fantastic website!I was hoping you might be able to assist with a few queries I have.I moved out of my parents’ house because I had a child (she is now 6 months) and got married. I am currently renting. However, I no longer wish to rent and don’t want to/can’t afford to buy a house.My idea was to move back to my parents but to get a log cabin the back garden. There are only 2 neighbours it might possibly affect, but I don’t think I will have any trouble with them.1. Do you think I am likely to be able to prove it is permitted development if it has no cooking facilities (just a kettle and fridge for my brews) and I have to use the main house to cook? I would like the cabin to have a toilet, bath and we will obviously be sleeping there. I will also be able to prove that I still have a bedroom inside the main property with my stuff in it.2. If the VOA deem that it needs to be banded for C Tax purposes; does this stick with you for life? If I was to turn it into a summer house eventually (a few years down the line) with no bedroom or maybe take the bath out could I get them out to look at it again? I am really conscious of my parents having a house with 2 council tax bands and how difficult that might be to sell it later down the line.This is likely to be a semi-permanent thing. I will be living there for the next four years and saving and then we are likely to use it as a base whilst we do some travelling with our daughter.Any advice would be much appreciated. I was originally looking at extending my parents property but it is very costly and I can get a properly insulated log cabin for about £10k that will do the job which we can turn into a mini house.Many thanks and take care, rob

Our Response:
You would need to check with your planning department, but if it had a fridge, kettle, bathroom and sleeping facilities, there's every chance you would need change of use consent. If you remove the facilities to have it changed (back) to a summerhouse in the future, we see no reason why that would not be possible, but again it's down to your planning authority.
ExtensionBuild - 30-Oct-17 @ 3:29 PM
Hi there. Fantastic website! I was hoping you might be able to assist with a few queries I have. I moved out of my parents’ house because I had a child (she is now 6 months) and got married. I am currently renting. However, I no longer wish to rent and don’t want to/can’t afford to buy a house. My idea was to move back to my parents but to get a log cabin the back garden. There are only 2 neighbours it might possibly affect, but I don’t think I will have any trouble with them. 1. Do you think I am likely to be able to prove it is permitted development if it has no cooking facilities (just a kettle and fridge for my brews) and I have to use the main house to cook? I would like the cabin to have a toilet, bath and we will obviously be sleeping there. I will also be able to prove that I still have a bedroom inside the main property with my stuff in it. 2. If the VOA deem that it needs to be banded for C Tax purposes; does this stick with you for life? If I was to turn it into a summer house eventually (a few years down the line) with no bedroom or maybe take the bath out could I get them out to look at it again? I am really conscious of my parents having a house with 2 council tax bands and how difficult that might be to sell it later down the line. This is likely to be a semi-permanent thing. I will be living there for the next four years and saving and then we are likely to use it as a base whilst we do some travelling with our daughter. Any advice would be much appreciated. I was originally looking at extending my parents property but it is very costly and I can get a properly insulated log cabin for about £10k that will do the job which we can turn into a mini house. Many thanks and take care, rob
Rob - 30-Oct-17 @ 11:28 AM
Boilingfrog - Your Question:
Hi all,the 3 bed house we bought had the adjoining garage converted to a self contained annex about 30 years ago. Upstairs is a 3 x 8 m room with kitchenette, downstairs same with shower room in an additional space 1.5 x 3 m.The annex is accessible through a normal doorway from our dining room, but also has its own exterior access.No planning permission was obtained and no records with the council exist.As it is so long converted is there any risk going now to the council and asking them to certify it?At present we use the annex as additional living space for our family, but clearly it is designed for inter-generational living or perhaps a lodger or au pair.As the council basically don't know about it we're only paying council tax on the main house, but I don't really see why more should be paid anyway given its current usage.I would like to try to get the house 'right' with the council as clearly it will impact the resale potential eventually as not everyone will take a chance as I have that no issues will arise. I wish I could get independent advice from an ex-council planner as to what might go wrong with 'coming clean' about the house as it is.

Our Response:
The annex should be exempt from Council tax if it is unoccupied (or used as part of your family home rather than letting it out), and it cannot be sold or let separately from the main house without breaking a planning restriction (you'd need change of use consent). The fact that the conversion has never had planning permission shouldn't be an issue becauseit's been there so long (eg. the council will no longer enforce it). It's worth getting it looked at in terms of building regulations just for your peace of mind and also to help with documentation if you ever sell the property.
ExtensionBuild - 27-Oct-17 @ 3:18 PM
Hi all, the 3 bed house we bought had the adjoining garage converted to a self contained annex about 30 years ago. Upstairs is a 3 x 8 m room with kitchenette, downstairs same with shower room in an additional space 1.5 x 3 m. The annex is accessible through a normal doorway from our dining room, but also has its own exterior access. No planning permission was obtained and no records with the council exist. As it is so long converted is there any risk going now to the council and asking them to certify it? At present we use the annex as additional living space for our family, but clearly it is designed for inter-generational living or perhaps a lodger or au pair. As the council basically don't know about it we're only paying council tax on the main house, but I don't really see why more should be paid anyway given its current usage. I would like to try to get the house 'right' with the council as clearly it will impact the resale potential eventually as not everyone will take a chance as I have that no issues will arise. I wish I could get independent advice from an ex-council planner as to what might go wrong with 'coming clean' about the house as it is.
Boilingfrog - 26-Oct-17 @ 12:34 AM
I currently own a detached house with a mortguage, I am considering building a small chalet bungalow for my wife and I to live in .The property has a very large garden so space is not an issue, the bungalow will share the services from the main house.When completed I intend to rent the main house out for an income.Can you I visage any problems with this scheme? Thank you
Phil - 25-Oct-17 @ 8:27 PM
Aly - Your Question:
What to do with an annexe when parents move/pass away. Although electric is shared, the annexe is detached from the main house, with a private lane (ours) separating the two. We have separate land registry titles but theres a section 106 tying the annexe to the house. We don't want to move, but when it's no longer required for my parents what do we do with it? We don't particularly want to be landlords. We'd like to sell it but how easy is it to get the section 106 removed.

Our Response:
It's worth seeking legal advice on this. A section 106 agreement can be discharged "by agreement between the authority by whom the obligation is enforceable and the person or persons against whom the obligation is enforceable". You may have a case especially if you feel that the section 106 is unreasonable (it's only one dwelling and you own the access road so the infrastructure implications are tiny).
ExtensionBuild - 27-Sep-17 @ 10:41 AM
Marked - Your Question:
Hi please help if you can.I have a converted garage at the end of the garden that was granted conversion for a granny annex. My mother in law was in there during her cancer treatment. After she passed away I let a friend of mine stay in there and he is still there. There is no rent being charged as he was homeless.The council is now saying that this is now not as the planning consent.Can you help advise what I have done wrong?ThanksMark

Our Response:
We don't have enough information really. What kind of planning consent was given for the initial granny annex. Was it a change of use etc?
ExtensionBuild - 26-Sep-17 @ 12:04 PM
What to do with an annexe when parents move/pass away. Although electric is shared, the annexe is detached from the main house, with a private lane (ours) separating the two. We have separate land registry titles but theres a section 106 tying the annexe to the house. We don't want to move, but when it's no longer required for my parents what do we do with it? We don't particularly want to be landlords. We'd like to sell it but how easy is it to get the section 106 removed.
Aly - 25-Sep-17 @ 1:28 PM
Hi please help if you can. I have a converted garage at the end of the garden that was granted conversion for a granny annex. My mother in law was in there during her cancer treatment. After she passed away I let a friend of mine stay in there and he is still there. There is no rent being charged as he was homeless. The council is now saying that this is now not as the planning consent. Can you help advise what I have done wrong? Thanks Mark
Marked - 24-Sep-17 @ 9:47 AM
Scepticus 58 - Your Question:
If I build a self-contained unit/annexe into/onto my present house for use by my 84 year old mother who is currently living in a rented house and receiving Housing Benefit etc., can I be classed as a landlord and legitimately receive her Housing benefit as rent at the appropriate rate for the premises provided? Does being a relative in any way disqualify me from being a Landlord to my mother in annexe accommodation?Scepticus 58

Our Response:
This is the advice from Shelter:
"You can't get housing benefit for rent you pay to a close family member you live with. For example, if you're living with your parents and paying towards household costs.
You can get housing benefit if you rent a property from a member of your close family who lives elsewhere. You can only get housing benefit in this situation if the council treat your tenancy as a commercial one rather than an informal family arrangement. The council will want to see proof of your tenancy, such as a contract or evidence of rent payments. The council may also want to see other evidence of a genuine landlord-tenant relationship. They might ask whether your relative took a security deposit or provided you with a gas safety certificate before you moved in. The council will refuse your housing benefit claim if it believes that your relative would not evict you even if you can't pay the rent."
ExtensionBuild - 7-Sep-17 @ 10:45 AM
If I build a self-contained unit/annexe into/onto my present house for use by my 84 year old mother who is currently living in a rented house and receiving Housing Benefit etc., can I be classed as a landlord and legitimately receive her Housing benefit as rent at the appropriate rate for the premises provided? Does being a relative in any way disqualify me from being a Landlord to my mother in annexe accommodation? Scepticus 58
Scepticus 58 - 5-Sep-17 @ 1:16 PM
JR - Your Question:
I built an attached self contained annex to our main house with living space, bathroom, bedroom and kitchen with access from inside the main house and also outside the main house. The valuation office viewed the property and applied a separate council tax banding B, which was fine, and the house is separately banded for Council Tax purposes.Originally, the annex was built for elderly parents who have since passed on.The Council have now applied a 25% increase to the council tax for second homes in the area and have included our annex, because they have now considered this a second home, although all the services to the main house are shared with the annex.We are happy to pay both council taxes on the main house and the annex, but certainly cannot understand the Council thinking on charging the second home premium of 25% on the annex. Is this action correct? and what if we sell the house?

Our Response:
Which area do you live in> It seems different councils can charge different amount on second properties. In Wales in particular, a premium is often added for second homes, especially if they're empty. If you want to appeal, you should follow your council's procedure for doing so.
ExtensionBuild - 23-Aug-17 @ 12:18 PM
I built an attached self contained annex to our main house with living space, bathroom, bedroom and kitchen with access from inside the main house and also outside the main house. The valuation office viewed the property and applied a separate council tax banding B, which was fine, and the house is separately banded for Council Tax purposes.Originally, the annex was built for elderly parents who have since passed on. The Council have now applied a 25% increase to the council tax for second homes in the area and have included our annex, because they have now considered this a second home, although all the services to the main house are shared with the annex. We are happy to pay both council taxes on the main house and the annex, but certainly cannot understand the Council thinking on charging the second home premium of 25% on the annex. Is this action correct? and what if we sell the house?
JR - 21-Aug-17 @ 2:14 PM
Diesel - Your Question:
We converted a pigsty to a flat at the bottom of the garden with planning permission for my father-in-law in 2000. It has water and electricity and telephone via the main house and a soil pipe into the sewer in the lane at the back of the garden (so it doesn't have share the main house sewer). It has a kitchenette, toilet/shower and bed/sitting room. The council have refused to give us exemption T because they say it does not have a planning permission restriction that it cannot be sold separately. We get exemption W when my Mum, who is 92, moves in. It clearly could not be sold separately given I can turn off it's water and electricity at the house. We have a separate stopcock for the annex but no water meter, and a separate electricity meter and switch for the annex in the main house cellar but it shares the main house incoming electricity supply cable and there is only one electricity bill. My question is, short of asking a council official to try to live there with electricity and water turned off, how can I convince them that it cannot be sold separately to the main house and get exemption T after my mother dies?

Our Response:
Most councils include accommodation that cannot be "let" separately. In your case it's feasible that the property could be let out. Could you take out the kitchen temporarily? Other than that, you may need a planning consultant or legal professional to take up the case for you.
ExtensionBuild - 2-Aug-17 @ 9:38 AM
WL - Your Question:
HiI have recently moved to house which has a converted outbuilding. We are looking to make this self contained for use as a holiday let. Would this be liable for additional council tax if it is not let out all the time?thanks in advance.WL

Our Response:
If it is self contained it will be liable for council tax. Some councils offer a discount for "empty properties" but this is not standard across the country so you should contact your own local authority for information.
ExtensionBuild - 1-Aug-17 @ 12:04 PM
We converted a pigsty to a flat at the bottom of the garden with planning permission for my father-in-law in 2000. It has water and electricity and telephone via the main house and a soil pipe into the sewer in the lane at the back of the garden (so it doesn't have share the main house sewer). It has a kitchenette, toilet/shower and bed/sitting room. The council have refused to give us exemption T because they say it does not have a planning permission restriction that it cannot be sold separately. We get exemption W when my Mum, who is 92, moves in. It clearly could not be sold separately given I can turn off it's water and electricity at the house. We have a separate stopcock for the annex but no water meter, and a separate electricity meter and switch for the annex in the main house cellar but it shares the main house incoming electricity supply cable and there is only one electricity bill. My question is, short of asking a council official to try to live there with electricity and water turned off, how can I convince them that it cannot be sold separately to the main house and get exemption T after my mother dies?
Diesel - 29-Jul-17 @ 2:33 PM
Hi I have recently moved to house which has a converted outbuilding. We are looking to make this self contained for use as a holiday let. Would this be liable for additional council tax if it is not let out all the time? thanks in advance. WL
WL - 28-Jul-17 @ 6:03 PM
Annex - Your Question:
We are in the process of trying to buy a home with a small old barn in the back garden which at some point has been converted to extra living accomodation. It contains a lounge, shower room, and upstairs a bedroom. The current owners have stated verbally that the original conversion was completed about 30 years ago and that they have fitted new windows, new different staircase and new shower room. They have been asked repeatedly (by our solicitor) for the past 8 weeks to supply written information about this and have as yet failed to do so. We have no evidence of any planning or building regs, or proof of when the conversion was done. Any advice on the implications if we went ahead with the purchase would be greatly appreciated.

Our Response:
Has your solicitor run a check with the local planning & building control department? Sorry it's not clear. This should clarify whether permission was granted or not. If planning permission was not granted and the seller can provide no evidence of a conversion date etc, there is not much you can do except to get a surveyor to look at it very carefully. If no planning permission was granted (and if it was required) originally, it may not need permission as it's been in place for 10 years. That doesn't help you with any details of how well constructed/building regs compliant the extension is of course; a good survey should help though.
ExtensionBuild - 26-Jul-17 @ 11:55 AM
We are in the process of trying to buy a home with a small old barn in the back garden which at some point has been converted to extra living accomodation. It contains a lounge, shower room, and upstairs a bedroom. The current owners have stated verbally that the original conversion was completed about 30 years ago and that they have fitted new windows, new different staircase and new shower room. They have been asked repeatedly (by our solicitor) for the past 8 weeks to supply written information about this and have as yet failed to do so. We have no evidence of any planning or building regs, or proof of when the conversion was done. Any advice on the implications if we went ahead with the purchase would be greatly appreciated.
Annex - 19-Jul-17 @ 7:07 PM
I had an old garage at the bottom of my garden which I knocked down and built a garden annexe,( which the council call an ancillary) .I got planning permission to build it.It has a lounge,bedroom,bathroom and utility room .I was not allowed a kitchen.The utilities run from the main house.I pay £150 council tax a month.My daughter lived in it for a while but now it's empty.I want to know if I can rent it as it has been empty now for over a year.
Lulu - 9-Jul-17 @ 11:50 PM
Adding to my last point, a test of "bricks and mortar" has been used by courts in deciding that an annex still exists once the kitchen is removed, saying that the zone is capable of being self contained by virtue of bricks and mortar (having its own front door - perversly does not related to the rest of the house - see my last post). These days three story houses may have a fire door on the landing as part of health and safety regulations. That in many cases makes a bricks and mortar case for the top floor being deemed an annex. Yet another point, when first installed, the annex attracted only 50% council tax when empty and since the rest of the house had had a banding reduction due to the reduction in size, the total council tax was not alot more than as a single property. Now the charge is 100% and could be more.
Bren - 1-Jun-17 @ 12:33 PM
I have an annex on the top floor of our three story home. We have not let it in over ten years because of young children in our family being exposed to strangers and of the loss of privacy in general- a lodger/tenant or holiday maker would have to come past our bedroom and toilet doors. The annex is self contained though we have always reserved the right to enter for access to the loft. The point, I want to make is that when I asked, "Trading Standards" a few years ago (considering living abroad for a while), they said that I could not describe the rest of the house as self contained if I wanted to let it. However, the local authority take the contrary view. A question is, what will HMRC consider it to be when selling for the purposes of capital gains tax?
Bren - 1-Jun-17 @ 12:23 PM
Pete - Your Question:
We extended our detached garage and turned it into an Anex with its own front door 8 years ago it has a bedroom a bathroom & kitchen all without planning permission is it too late for them to tell us to knock it down and should we get something called indemnity insurance? And could we let it out now. I would love an answer thank you

Our Response:
In general where there has been a breach of planning control relating to the change of use of any building to use as a single dwellinghouse, no enforcement action may be taken after the end of the period of four years beginning with the date of the breach. In the case of any other breach of planning control, no enforcement action may be taken after the end of the period of ten years beginning with the date of the breach. If you cannot prove the bulding has been used as a dwelling for the past four years then it may be difficult to avoid enforcement. Indeminty insurance might help but you'd need to seek advice from a professional before proceeding.
ExtensionBuild - 30-May-17 @ 12:37 PM
We extended our detached garage and turned it into an Anex with its own front door 8years agoit has a bedroom a bathroom & kitchen all without planning permission is it too late for them to tell us to knock it downand should we get something called indemnity insurance?And could we let it out now.I would love an answer thank you
Pete - 27-May-17 @ 4:05 PM
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